CCRP Organization Meeting Recap

Posted: January 10, 2015 in Uncategorized

On Thursday evening, the new body of PCOs convened to elect executive board members. Recalling the meeting in 2012, the lead-up to this year’s elections had far less tension. While Team Herrera and the old guard were present, efforts by Herrera’s office to recruit candidates to run against the more reform-minded existing board had come up empty. Given the results of the recent election, and the countless hours that chairman Kenny Smith and his team had put into helping Jeanne Stewart and Lynda Wilson gain seats from the Democrats, it seems that few were interested in interrupting the tremendous progress being made by the newer volunteers.

The one exception was in the case of the 17th Legislative District chair, formerly occupied by bylaws author and technology guru Eric Heredia, who was vacating the seat due to the impending arrival of a future lover of liberty, a higher calling that had also caused the former committeeman and committee woman, James Randall and Laney Maxwell, to give up their posts this time around. While former CCRP Secretary Vicki Kraft had made known her intentions to run for LD 17 Chair weeks ago, a last-minute nomination came in for Port Commissioner and newly-minted PCO Jerry Oliver. In fact, the nomination had evidently come post-last-minute by former CCRP chairman Stephanie McClintock and former CCRP Treasurer Dan Barnes. The tardiness in sending in their nominations despite multiple communications from the chairman regarding the deadline resulted in Oliver having to request that the body of PCOs suspend the meeting rules in order to be allowed on the ballot. The PCOs were torn between wanting to be supportive of a new PCO and not wanting to set a terrible precedent in allowing last-minute surprise nominations to occur, and by a close vote, they decided to uphold the rules of the meeting, rules which, ironically, had been put forward by McClintock and Barnes at the Organization meeting in 2012. Oliver ran as a write-in candidate, and eventually Vicki prevailed by a convincing vote of 37-6.

The rest of the board positions were unopposed, and the new board was quickly elected as follows:

Chairman – Kenny Smith

Vice-Chairman – Lisa Ross

State Committee Man: Christian Berrigan

State Committee Woman: Katja Delavar

Secretary: Mary Sue Davis

Treasurer: Alan Svehaug

LD 17 Chair: Vicki Kraft

LD 18 Chair: John Anderson

LD 49 Chair: Jim Johnson

LD 20 Chair: Ron Fitch

LD 14 Chair: Piper McEwen

This impressive group of volunteers will lead the party into the new presidential cycle, as well as numerous elections for County and City councilors and then Senate and Representative seats for both state and federal office in 2016.

Herrera Staff Member Shows Contempt for PCOs

Of course, even with a unified slate, it would not be a CCRP Org meeting without some element of controversy, and this one closed with a PCO introducing a motion on whether to consider a censure of Jaime Herrera at the next meeting, to be held sometime in March. The author of the motion produced a good sized laundry list of bad votes from the congresswoman (see link below).

Resolution on Jaime Herrera Beutler_CUL

While very few of the audience had actually read the motion, there were some strong opinions about it expressed during the meeting, particularly from those in Herrera’s camp. As many may know, several of Herrera’s office staffers are now PCOs. One of them, Jonathan Egan, got up to argue against the motion and took the opportunity to introduce himself to the body by way of a lambasting of the entire CCRP, saying, among other things, that they were considered a laughingstock in Southwest Washington. I was curious why a congressional staffer who considered a body of Republicans a ‘laughingstock’ would want to join their number. One might think he had better things to do. At any rate, it was quite an introduction by a first-time PCO to a group of folks that were nearly all his senior in age and experience. My attempt to contact him for clarification about his comments has thus far gone without response.

The motion to consider the resolution at the next meeting passed 59-49. There is little doubt that being called a laughingstock by a member of Herrera’s office had something to do with the result. The next meeting will likely be well attended and a lot of fireworks can be expected. In the meantime, I encourage you, dear reader, to check out the text of the resolution above and see whether or not you agree with the author’s conclusions. My own vote will likely depend on the response from Herrera’s office in the next few months. If they are done laughing at the volunteers, that is.

All in all, it was a good meeting. A great board was retained, and despite the opinions from Team Herrera, the party and its efforts grow stronger with each passing month, as the elections in November indicated. The next stop is the first meeting of the Washington Republican state committee next week, and the election of a new WSRP chairman. Every two years, we get to gauge whether or not the Liberty movement in Washington is a cute side show, or a genuine shift in the direction of the Republican party. Stay tuned.

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Comments
  1. Mary Nevius says:

    The amount of people that feel our elected officials should sacrifice principals in favor of popularity was unsettling. It is this very attitude that has the average American hating politicians in general.

  2. It’s about time. I fully endorse the resolution for censure.

  3. tomncdcs says:

    Remember that they censured McCain in Az because of his voting record! As a historical perspective, the actions in the Congress were predicted by the Anti-federalists and in particular I discuss this corruption of the House in this past Saturday’s radio program by bringing out what Robert Yates had to say in Brutus IV.

    This is an interesting decision by the PCO’s and the precedent has been established by what Az did last year. The sadness of it all is that the political machine doesn’t care just as Yates predicted.

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